First of all I'm not a crazy game player, mad about over clocking his precious PC but of course I don't mind the system running smoothly. However, the main reason to change way of cooling my PC's CPU  was to make a computer to run as quiet as possible. I changed of course a CPU's fan mode to silent, but I wanted more. One evening I dismantled CPU's heat sink, measured processor, location of mounting holes and after putting everything together started to design heat exchanger. Few hours later my raw idea became a fully grown up design. It was still not too late to order some handsome piece of 12mm aluminium plate.

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    Few days later strait after arrival of alu plate I headed to my shed. My CNC mill have strong steel frame with MDF bed. On the top of it there is another chipboard screwed which I mount materials prior to cutting onto. This time I've made another holder to accommodate my alu plate. Not very pretty, but does its job.

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Having design, material and free time I let my CNC mill to do hard work. My diesel cooling solution and 3mm HSS end mill and another test for my newly built CNC Mill Spindle . Coolant is there not much for cooling, but rather to remove the chips. It lubricates end mill as well against clogging with swarf.

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I inserted M1 code into NC code in order to reposition holding clamps. When machine stopped after cutting out all inside profiles I screwed on my parts to the bed and let CNC run again. For some reason I don't like to produce holding tabs joining parts with piece of material.

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The mount is cut from a 3mm steel plate. Pipe fittings are made from M10 bolts which are cut to size and bored with 6mm drill bit.

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Before screwing pipe fittings into cooler I've put a bit of two compound adhesive on thread, creating water tight connection. I sealed two halves of CPU heat exchanger with some more adhesive and screwed them together with mounting plate.

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The pipes I used are 8mm internal diameter PVC clear. They connect a cooler with water storage tank. To attach cooler to CPU I had to make four metal adapters with M4 threaded bore. Small pieces of plastic isolate metal mounting parts from PCB.

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 I used 3 litre plastic bucket to store a cooling water. There is no pump to circulate. It is a wholly gravity circulating cooling system. Below there are two pictures, the one on left taken with standard heatsink, and on the right with my heat exchanger after 2 hours of computer working from cold start. A use of the CPU is similar in both cases and the average temp is 50C with old heatsink and 37C with my heat exchanger.

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I dug out from drawer my old Atmel microcontroller board, connected two DS1820 temperature sensors. I installed them on cooler inlet and outlet. LCD display shows  temperatures. Top row shows outlet, lower line inlet water temperature. First column is actual readout, second is lowest recorded temperature, third maximum recorded temperature and last lower readout shows current temperature difference between inlet and outlet. The difference in temperature  with this setup is 1-2C. All temperatures are shown in centigrade's  x10 with 0.1C precision.

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I plan to replace a bucket with some bigger volume fish tank and make proper inlets on tank's side wall. Graphic card will be next to replace but I must get the tank first.


The graphic card and MCU cooler


After more than a year of working my NVIDIA GeForce 8600 GTS graphic card fan started to work very loudly. That was another reason to quiet down a computer by making water cooling system. Like previously, I milled cooling element with my DIY CNC . Picture on the left shows it and two (4 halves) manifolds.

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While making a manifold I thought of making a cooler for mainboard MCU which was getting pretty hot (more than 50 centigrade).

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Two halves are screwed together with using M4 screws and sealed with 2 compound epoxy glue.

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I did try to engrave website name but with a poor result as I set up Z axis too deep making letter outline too wide and hence barely readable. That was my first time engraving :) .

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Next, I installed manifold mounting plate to the back of the tower previously cutting out grill destined for spare case fan.

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As you can see on a picture on the right, some tubes are brownish - that's algae growing inside. I will have to buy some treatment to get rid of it. There on top of a manifolds are two bolts/plugs.  I intended to use them for inlet and outlet water temperature sensors, but after setting up a whole system I thought about replacing power supplies heatsinks with water coolers. This way I'll get rid of all fans from my PC.

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OK, the aim achieved, I have very quiet and over clocked computer now. It's just this thought in a back of the head. I think power supply will be next :)))))))))